ACORN categoriesHouseholds

Thriving

Expanding

Rising

D

Settling

24.5

E

Aspiring

13.9

F

Striving

23.2

ACORN groups

%

A

1

Wealthy achievers, suburban areas

14.0

A

2

Affluent greys, rural communities

2.2

A

3

Prosperous pensioners, retirement areas

2.8

B

4

Affluent executives, family areas

3.4

B

5

Well off workers, family areas

7.0

C

6

Affluent urbanites, town and city areas

2.5

C

7

Prosperous professionals, metropolitan areas

2.5

C

8

Better off executives, inner city areas

4.0

D

9

Comfortable middle agers, mature home owning areas

13.7

D

10

Skilled workers, home owning areas

10.8

E

11

New home owners, mature communities

9.9

E

12

White collar workers, better-off multi-ethnic areas

4.0

F

13

Older people, less prosperous areas

4.4

F

14

Council estate residents, better off homes

10.9

F

15

Council estate residents, high unemployment

3.6

F

16

Council estate residents, greatest hardship

2.4

F

17

People in multi ethnic, low income areas

1.8

ACORN neighbourhood types % Social grade

A1

1.1

Wealthy suburbs, large detached houses

2.2

AB

A1

1.2

Villages with wealthy commuters

2.8

AB

A1

1.3

Mature affluent home-owning areas

2.7

ABC1

A1

1.4

Affluent suburbs, older families

3.4

ABC1

A1

1.5

Mature, well-off suburbs

2.9

ABC1

A2

2.6

Agricultural villages, home-based workers

1.5

ABC2D

A2

2.7

Holiday retreats, older people, home based workers

0.7

ABC2D

A3

3.8

Home owning areas, well-off older residents

1.5

ABC1

A3

3.9

Private flats, elderly people

1.3

ABC1

B4

4.10

Affluent working families with mortgages

1.8

ABC1

B4

4.11

Affluent working couples with mortgages, new homes

1.3

ABC1

B4

4.12

Transient workforces, living at their place of work

0.3

-

B5

5.13

Home-owning family areas

2.5

ABC1

B5

5.14

Home-owning family areas, older children

2.6

C1C2

B5

5.15

Families with mortgages, younger children

1.9

C1C2

C6

6.16

Well-off town and city areas

1.1

AB

C6

6.17

Flats and mortgages, singles and young working couples

0.9

ABC1

C6

6.18

Furnished flats and bedsits, younger single people

0.5

ABC1

C7

7.19

Apartments, young professional singles and couples

1.4

ABC1

C7

7.20

Gentrified multi-ethnic areas

1.1

ABC1

C8

8.21

Prosperous enclaves, highly qualified executives

0.9

ABC1

C8

8.22

Academic centres, students and young professionals

0.6

ABC1

C8

8.23

Affluent city centre areas, tenements and flats

0.7

ABC1

C8

8.24

Partially gentrified, multi-ethnic areas

0.8

ABC1

C8

8.25

Converted flats and bedsits, single people

1.0

-

D9

9.26

Mature established home-owning areas

3.4

ABC1

D9

9.27

Rural areas, mixed occupation

3.4

-

D9

9.28

Established home-owning areas

3.9

C1

D9

9.29

Home-owning areas, council tenants, retired people

3.0

ABC1

D10

10.30

Established home-owning areas, skilled workers

4.3

C2

D10

10.31

Home owners in older properties, younger workers

3.2

C1C2

D10

10.32

Home-owning areas with skilled workers

3.3

C2DE

E11

11.33

Council areas, some new home owners

3.7

C2DE

E11

11.34

Mature home-owning areas, skilled workers

3.3

C2DE

E11

11.35

Low-rise estates, older workers, new home owners

2.9

C2DE

E12

12.36

Home-owning multi-ethnic areas, young families

1.0

C1

E12

12.37

Multi-occupied town centres, mixed occupations

2.0

-

E12

12.38

Multi-ethnic areas, white-collar workers

1.0

C1

F13

13.39

Home owners, small council flats, single pensioners

2.3

C2DE

F13

13.40

Council areas, older people, health problems

2.1

C2DE

F14

14.41

Better-off council areas, new home owners

2.0

C2DE

F14

14.42

Council areas, young families, some new home owners

2.7

C2DE

F14

14.43

Council areas, young families, many lone parents

1.6

C2DE

F14

14.44

Multi-occupied terraces, multi-ethnic areas

0.7

C2DE

F14

14.45

Low-rise council housing, less well-off families

1.8

C2DE

F14

14.46

Council areas, residents with health problems

2.1

C2DE

F15

15.47

Estates with high unemployment

1.3

DE

F15 15.48 Council flats, elderly people, health problems

F15 15.49 Council flats, very high unemployment, singles

F16 16.50 Council areas, high unemployment, lone parents

F16 16.51 Council flats, greatest hardship, many lone

1.1 C2DE

parents

F17 17.52 Multi-ethnic, large families, overcrowding F17 17.53 Multi-ethnic, severe unemployment, lone parents F17 17.54 Multi-ethnic, high unemployment, overcrowding

ACORN has been used by local authorities to isolate areas of deprivation and by marketing firms seeking to identify areas of greatest demand for their products and services. Major retailers, banks and building societies use the service for site analysis and the mix of products appropriate to each branch. It is also used to target local advertising, posters, leaflet distribution and direct mail. Researchers can also use the system to select representative samples for questionnaire surveys.

Variations on the ACORN system have been introduced to serve the classification needs of specific markets, including Investor ACORN, Scottish ACORN and Financial ACORN. ACORN services have also been extended to Northern Ireland, with the consequent addition of six more neighbourhood types. Workforce ACORN compares the differing profile of an area in a given location during working hours and weekends. Custom ACORN links company data to the ACORN system to create a bespoke targeting classification.

CACI has also produced systems that look at individuals. People UK is a good example of this; it looks at 46 types and eight life stages.

Experian (Tel: 01159 410 888, Fax: 01159 685 003, E-mail:

[email protected]). This system is based around 87 variables, producing 12 groups and 52 types of neighbourhood.

The MOSAIC system includes 52 consumer types that are aggregated into 12 groups:

L1 High Income Families

L2 Suburban Semis

L3 Blue Collar Owners

L4 Low Rise Council

L5 Council Flats

L6 Victorian Low Status

L7 Town Houses and Flats

L8 Stylish Singles

L9 Independent Elders

L10 Mortgaged Families

L11 Country Dwellers

L12 Institutional Areas

MOSAIC

Sources of MOSAIC's data include:

Census Statistics

■ Electoral Registers

■ The Lord Chancellor's Office

■ Companies House

■ Land Registry

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