Glossary of Fashion Marketing Terms

Advertising is persuasive and or informative non-personal communications paid for by a clearly identifiable sponsor. Break-even analysis shows the relationship between fixed costs, variable or marginal costs, total costs, sales revenue and output or volume. Causal research is used to determine the relationship between variables, e.g. the relationship between advertising and repeat purchases. Concessions also known as shops-within-shops, can be defined as space leased by the host retailer to...

The fashion product life cycle

Fashion Product Life Cycle

The concept of the product life cycle is based on the proposal that all products have a finite 'life cycle' that can be plotted over a given period using the biological analogy of growth, development and decline. It proposes that all products will go through four major stages, namely introduction into the marketplace, growth, maturity and decline. However, it has already been pointed out that the nature of products in the fashion industry varies according to the rate, extent and timescale of...

The fashion marketing concept

There is another way to view the relationship between marketing and design, and this is termed the fashion marketing concept. That good fashion design only requires sufficient promotion to succeed is a view Figure 1.3 The fashion marketing concept. applicable to a very limited number of businesses - usually those producing expensive garments for an elite market. The alternative view of fashion design as a function of marketing research fails to recognize either that many people do not know what...

Ethical issues in fashion marketing

The practice of fashion marketing is often criticized. These criticisms can be classified into two types, the micro-issues and the macro-issues. Micro-issues concern particular products and services where consumers may feel that they have not been fairly treated or that they have been misled. Most customers have bought clothing that has fallen below expectations by, for example, coming apart at the seams or shrinking in the wash. These problems may occur due to poor quality control or at worst...

An overview of the fashion marketing process

Fashion Marketing Process

Fashion marketing can be viewed as a process and Figure 1.4 illustrates that process. It also gives an indication of the structure of this book and how various parts link together. All firms operate within a wider commercial environment that influences their activities. Changes in value added tax may inhibit demand for certain garments whereas a fall in unemployment may stimulate demand for workwear. These two simple examples illustrate how changes in the marketing environment can have...

Choice of a sampling method

Types Sampling Methods

The two main types of sampling method - probability methods and non-probability methods - are shown in Figure 4.3. Figure 4.3 Types of sampling method. Figure 4.3 Types of sampling method. Statistically speaking, these are the best types of sampling method as each respondent has a known chance of being selected, so bias is minimized. They also allow the accuracy of the results to be estimated statistically. Sometimes probability sampling methods are referred to generically as 'random sampling'...

How fashion marketing can help the fashion industry

The vast output and profits from the fashion industry come not from the designer collections seen on the catwalk but from items sold in high street stores. To put the impact of designers in perspective, one only has to note that the British Fashion Awards' Designer of the Year will often have annual earnings that amount to less than a day's sales for one large retailer in the Arcadia group. Even so, the designer collections are given extensive coverage in the fashion press where each season...

Primary data collection methods

The researcher should not rely on the use of secondary data alone to answer the research problems. Not all secondary data are available to the researcher as some may be unavailable, for example in confidential reports, and other data may simply be too costly to acquire. The information that is available may be out-of-date or not sufficiently Figure 4.4 Approaches to primary data collection. Figure 4.4 Approaches to primary data collection. detailed to solve the research problem. Usually,...