The Likert Scale

More people are familiar with this scale than its name. The Likert scale is similar to the comparative scale, but responses are measured in degrees of agreement with a brief statement, as demonstrated in the examples shown in Figure 2-5.

I would like my next keyboard to be engineered to reduce miskeying.

(5) Strongly agree (4) Agree (3) Neither agree nor disagree (2) Disagree (1) Strongly disagree

I would prefer a laptop screen that can display two A4-size pages.

(5) Strongly agree (4) Agree (3) Neither agree nor disagree (2) Disagree (1) Strongly disagree

I would like a program that automatically returns me to where I last closed down.

(5) Strongly agree (4) Agree (3) Neither agree nor disagree (2) Disagree (1) Strongly disagree

Figure 2-5: Questions applying the Likert scale.

Occasionally there are three or seven response options but five is the classic number. The Likert scale is normally introduced to assess the strength of reactions to ideas that are difficult to quantify, particularly intangibles such as attitudes, personal taste knowledge, perceptions, and values in general terms. Because of this, the Likert scale is widely used in qualitative research.

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