Consolidated Amalgamated Harry E Slicksmile

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Supplier selection new parts. Perhaps a purchasing manager is unhappy with a current supplier's product quality, service, or prices. AExternally, the buyer may get some new ideas at a trade show, see an ad, or receive a call from a salesperson who offers a better product or a lower price.

In fact, in their advertising, business marketers often alert customers to potential problems and then show how their products provide solutions. For example, a Sharp ad notes that a multifunction printer can present data security problems and asks "Is your MFP a portal for identity theft?" The solution? Sharp's data security kits "help prevent sensitive information from falling into the wrong hands."

General Need Description

Having recognized a need, the buyer next prepares a general need description that describes the characteristics and quantity of the needed item. For standard items, this process presents few problems. For complex items, however, the buyer may need to work with others—engineers, users, consultants—to define the item. The team may want to rank the importance of reliability, durability, price, and other attributes desired in the item. In this phase, the alert business marketer can help the buyers define their needs and provide information about the value of different product characteristics.

#> FIGURE | 6.3 Stages of the Business Buying Process

Marketing 6.2

Companies must help their managers understand international customers and customs. For example, Japanese people revere the business card as an extension 0f Self—they do not hand it out to people, they present it.

This hypothetical case has been exaggerated for emphasis. But experts say success in international business has a lot to do with knowing the territory and its people. By learning English and

Marketing 6.2

International Marketing Manners:

When in Rome, Do as the Romans Do

Picture this: Consolidated Amalgamation, Inc., thinks it's time that the rest of the world enjoyed the same fine products it has offered American consumers for two generations. It dispatches Vice President Harry E. Slicksmile to Europe, Africa, and Asia to explore the territory. Mr. Slicksmile stops first in London, where he makes short work of some bankers—he rings them up on the phone. He handles Parisians with similar ease: After securing a table at La Tour d'Argent, he greets his luncheon guest, the director of an industrial engineering firm, with the words, "Just call me Harry, Jacgues."

In Germany, Mr. Slicksmile is a powerhouse. Whisking through a lavish, state-of-the-art multimedia marketing presentation on his Toshiba tablet laptop, he shows 'em that he knows how to make a buck. Heading on to Milan, Harry strikes up a conversation with the Japanese businessman sitting next to him on the plane. He flips his card onto the guy's tray and, when the two say good-bye, shakes hands warmly and clasps the man's right arm. Later, for his appointment with the owner of an Italian packaging design firm, our hero wears his comfy corduroy sport coat, khaki pants, and Topsiders. Everybody knows Italians are zany and laid back.

Mr. Slicksmile next swings through Saudi Arabia, where he coolly presents a potential client with a multimillion-dollar proposal In a classy pigskin binder. At his next stop in Beijing, China, he talks business over lunch with a group of Chinese executives. After completing the meal, he drops his chopsticks Into his bowl of rice and presents each guest with an elegant Tiffany clock as a reminder of his visit. Then, at his final junket in Phuket, Thailand, Mr. Slicksmile wastes no time diving into his business proposal before treating his Thai clients to a first-class lunch.

A great tour, sure to generate a pile of orders, right? Wrong. Six months later, Consolidated Amalgamation has nothing to show for the trip but a stack of bills. Abroad, they weren't wild about Harry.

Companies must help their managers understand international customers and customs. For example, Japanese people revere the business card as an extension 0f Self—they do not hand it out to people, they present it.

This hypothetical case has been exaggerated for emphasis. But experts say success in international business has a lot to do with knowing the territory and its people. By learning English and

Proposal solicitation

The stage of the business buying process in which the buyer invites qualified suppliers to submit proposals.

Supplier selection

The stage of the business buying process in which the buyer reviews proposals and selects a supplier or suppliers.

Proposal Solicitation

In the proposal solicitation stage of the business buying process, the buyer invites qualified suppliers to submit proposals. In response, some suppliers will send only a catalog or a salesperson. However, when the item is complex or expensive, the buyer will usually require detailed written proposals or formal presentations from each potential supplier.

Business marketers must be skilled in researching, writing, and presenting proposals in response to buyer proposal solicitations. Proposals should be marketing documents, not just technical documents. Presentations should inspire confidence and should make the marketer's company stand out from the competition.

Supplier Selection

The members of the buying center now review the proposals and select a supplier or suppliers. During supplier selection, the buying center often will draw up a list of the desired supplier attributes and their relative importance. Such attributes include product and service quality, reputation, on-time delivery, ethical corporate behavior, honest communication, and competitive prices. The members of the buying center will rate suppliers against these attributes and identify the best suppliers.

Buyers may attempt to negotiate with preferred suppliers for better prices and terms before making the final selections. In the end, they may select a single supplier or a few suppliers. Many buyers prefer multiple sources of supplies to avoid being totally dependent on one supplier and to allow comparisons of prices and performance of several suppliers over

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Responses

  • susanne freytag
    How do i strike up conversation with buyer in trade show?
    8 years ago

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